Monday, September 28, 2015

Whew! We're Still Here

As many of you may already know, preparedness shops in Utah have been selling out of their 72-hour kits and freeze-dried food rations in preparation for the apocalypse that was supposed to happen last night.

I don't really have much to say about this, other than to suggest that a 72-hour kit might not be enough to last through an apocalypse. Also to lament that I am not the author of the accompanying best sellers.

But it seemed like waking up this morning to discover that the world hadn't ended was worth a post.

In that spirit, congratulations, Gentle Readers!

Hell, I may even toss some freeze-dried blueberries on my nitrogen-packed cracked wheat this morning.

12 comments:

  1. 72 hours? What a rip-off. The zombies and werewolves will tear everyone apart within the first 12 hours of an apocalypse. Everyone knows that!

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    1. Indeed. They need better information. Perhaps we should co-author a book. ;)

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  2. No, see, you buy, like, 60 72-hour kits and string them out. That gives you enough time to assume world dominion in the post-apocolypto world.

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    1. Oh, I see! This is an inspired strategy indeed.

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  3. An apocalypse was going to happen and nobody told me?!? I am truly hurt! What if it had been real this time? Not like the other 500 or so in my lifetime.
    So what do those poor stupid bastards do now?

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    1. Wait for the next prediction of doom. This time if I hear about it in advance I'll let you know asap. :)

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  4. My brother has a 72-hour kit that my grandfather gave him for Christmas. I didn't get one because my grandfather hates me and would probably prefer that I not survive even 72 hours if a major disaster or anything else of significance happened. My brother is keeping the kit because we're in earthquake country, as you presumably are, too. I looked at a geological map, and it showed that we're on solid bedrock, which is the safest land on which to live in terms of earthquakes, though if the epicenter is near enough, anyone is likely to have some damage. Also, even if we're theoretically fine, something that happened forty miles away could leave us without power for god knows how long. also, our elevation is less than 100 feet, so we're probably in some danger from a flood or tsunami angle, though it would take some tsunami to reach us right away in here. It does not a lot of good to worry about such things, nonetheless. My mom said when she was a kid, no one believed we'd have reached well into this century without The Big One happening yet.

    I thought the blood moon was lovely, though the view on the east coast was surely much more dramatic. Why not just enjoy nature's phenomena instead of attaching religious significance to every little thing?

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    1. I agree, Alexis. It's disconcerting that so many people live in continual fear of destruction, damnation, etc.

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  5. I'm really bummed that the City of Enoch didn't return to Earth in a spaceship and take all the preppers and other righteous folks to another planet … leaving us to the destruction that awaits those heathens who would legalize gay marriage, marijuana, and thinking.

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    1. Wow. Now that's an end of times I could almost buy into!

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    2. I know! It's really edgy and daring. Especially the thinking part.

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  6. I'm going to my godchild's birthday next weekend. Perhaps I should take a Donald Trump pinata.

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